Destinations, Travel Tips, Wander
Comments 6

Ten Important Things to Know When Traveling to Mexico

The enchanting land south of the border is one of the best destinations you’ll ever explore in your life. But like any other destination, there are things you must keep in mind during your visit to Mexico to guarantee your health and safety as well as to avoid unfortunate incidents that might ruin your vacation.

We’ve been to and explored different parts of this beautiful country now, and we’ve learned quite a few things during those visits that we’d like to share with you. Here are some important things you should keep in mind when traveling to Mexico.

IMG_6484

Puerto Vallarta | Photo: Michelle Rae

Plan out (and book, if possible) your transportation before you go. Unlike in first world countries, finding transportation in most parts of Mexico does not come easy. Public transportation, even in big cities like Cancun, while extensive, is not as modern and easy to figure out. And in some places, driving is not recommended for tourists. Do a lot of research before you go. Determine if it’s safe to drive a rental car around the area you’re visiting (the Riviera Maya and Puerto Vallarta are great examples) or figure out which public buses you can take to get you places and whether cabs are available for convenience. Better yet, have your hotel arrange drop offs and pick-ups for you.

Roaming plan goes a long way. Mobile service providers usually offer fairly inexpensive roaming plans that should cover you during your visit. Don’t make the same mistake we made and purchase one before your trip. It comes very handy if you’ll find yourself stuck somewhere because you missed the last bus or if there’s an emergency.

Don’t drink the water. Unless you’re staying at a resort that treats their water (Velas Vallarta, for example), don’t drink tap water in Mexico. Don’t drink it, don’t brush your teeth with it. Just don’t. It’s probably safe for the locals, but not for you. Buy bottled water from the grocery store and use that as if your life depended on it… because it probably does.

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

Las Tlayudas de Playa, Playa del Carmen | Photo: Michelle Rae

IMG_3200-2

Tlayudas from Las Tlayudas de Playa | Photo: Michelle Rae

IMG_3275-2

Carnitas with chicharron in Playa del Carmen | Photo: Michelle Rae

Eat at local, non-touristy restaurants. Mexico has some of the best dishes we’ve ever had in our life – carnitas with chicharron as well as roasted chicken in PlayaCar, battered fish and shrimp tacos AND ceviche in Ensenada, carne asada tacos in the Riviera Maya, simply because we braved eating at local restaurants and food stands that most tourists don’t usually go to. Just make sure to do research beforehand and eat at those spots that get more traffic, so you don’t risk food poisoning. Travel and eat smart!

Our short list of Mexico restaurant recommendations to come soon!

Processed with VSCOcam with c1 preset

Local fishermen in Yelapa, Jalisco | Photo: Michelle Rae

IMG_6480

Staircase in Downtown Puerto Vallarta | Photo: Michelle Rae

IMG_5840

Guadalupe Valley, Baja California | Photo: Michelle Rae

Go off the beaten path. Don’t miss out on wonderful finds simply because you’re too afraid to stray just a little. Yes, some parts of Mexico are dangerous, but what most people do not realize is that the country is massive and most of it is safe, with locals who are warm, friendly and welcoming. Again, stay smart and do your research; but don’t be afraid to venture off the beaten path. You’ll be rewarded with beautiful beaches, adorable small towns, and probably some of the best memories.

_DSF4089-1

Chichen Itza | Photo: Michelle Rae

Learn some Spanish. It doesn’t matter whether you’re visiting a town under the radar or staying in a resort destination – it’s very likely that you’ll come across non-English speaking locals who you’re going to have to communicate with, even if it’s for something as simple as asking for plastic utensils at a restaurant. And learning a few basic words and phrases will help a great deal.

Carry cash. Small restaurants, some shops, taxis, buses and food stands especially do not accept credit or debit cards, so do make sure to carry enough cash around. Having cash around also makes it easier to tip your servers as well as the hotel staff. (And yes, they do tip in Mexico!)

Get a fast pass when crossing the border. Driving into Mexico from the US is so easy it’s kinda eerie, but driving back is a completely different story entirely. In fact, you might spend a few hours waiting in line in your car at the border crossing station with hundreds of other cars, and that’s not at all fun. See if your hotel offers fast passes for their guests; you’ll still have to wait in line but these fast passes can get you on the “fast lane” and cut a couple of hours off your wait time.

IMG_5770

In Baja California near the | Photo: Michelle Rae

Skip the souvenir shops and buy the more authentic products instead. Trust us, most products you’ll find at a souvenir shop in Cancun, you’ll most likely find at a different souvenir shop in Cabo. When shopping for mementos to take home, look for stores that sell the more authentic products – Catrina sculptures, locally produced coffee and indigenous artworks are a few examples.

IMG_6436-2

Cool metal sculptures on the Malecon in Puerto Vallarta | Photo: Michelle Rae

Don’t pay to take photos with the animals. During your explorations, you’ll meet a couple of locals who will invite you to hold and take photos with an adorable lion or panther cub they happen to be carrying for a few dollars. It’s hard to resist, we know, especially if you’re an animal lover like us. However, the sad truth is these cubs are drugged to keep them tame and safe for tourists to handle, probably mistreated, and then dumped when they’re too old. We actually called a couple of animal rescue centers in the Riviera Maya the first time we encountered such activity, and they told us that some of these people are employed by drug cartels. Please, please do not support and encourage this type of activity.

 

all rights reserved. no part of this blog post may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the author.

6 Comments

  1. argeymum says

    In planning our year of world travel with the family, my husband and I keep saying how much we’d love to go to Mexico, but probably not something we should do with young kids. I’d pretty much reluctantly resigned myself to the fact that we wouldn’t be going there – and now I am wondering AGAIN if it is somewhere we could go 🙂 Oh dear!

    ArgeyMum
    TheArgeFam
    http://www.lotsofplanetshaveanorth.com

    • You definitely should! People have an exaggerated perception of Mexico. It’s a beautiful country and except for a few admittedly dangerous areas (like most countries) it’s safe for families with kids. Recommended spots: Riviera Maya, Puerto Vallarta and Baja Sur. xo

  2. Pingback: 16 Under the Radar Spots for Families in Mexico for 2016 |

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s